Will flights be delayed or cancelled after Brexit?

Many people already have their summer holidays booked, but questions over if flights will go ahead as planned after March 29 are on everyone's lips.

Thursday, 7th February 2019, 8:33 am
Updated Thursday, 7th February 2019, 5:10 pm

easyJet has released a statement to calm any concerns passengers may have.

It is trading statement for the quarter ending December 31, 2018 it had a section dedicated to Brexit.

It said: "easyJet is well prepared for Brexit.

Will flights be cancelled or delayed after Brexit?

"It now has 130 aircraft registered in Austria and has made good progress ensuring it has a spare parts pool in the EU27 and in transferring crew licences, both of which will be completed by March 29.

"Both the EU and the UK have committed to ensure that flights between the UK and EU will continue in the event of a no-deal Brexit."

ABTA, the leading association of travel agents and tour operators, has also said: "There is nothing to suggest that you will not be able to continue with your holiday plans after 29 March. Even in a no-deal scenario, the European Commission has said flights to and from the UK will still be able to operate.

"Customers who book a package holiday with a UK travel company enjoy the most comprehensive consumer protection: if you book a package, your holiday will be protected under the Package Travel Regulations, meaning you have a right to a full refund if your holiday can no longer be provided."

However, Ryanair's third quarter report said that the risk of a 'no deal' Brexit remains worryingly high.

It said: "While we hope that common sense will prevail, and lead to either a delay in Brexit, or agreement on the 21 month transition deal currently on the table, we have taken all necessary steps to protect Ryanair’s business in a no-deal environment.

"We have now obtained a UK AOC to protect our three domestic UK routes, and we will place restrictions on the voting rights and share sales of non-EU shareholders for a period of time (in the event of a hard Brexit) to ensure that Ryanair remains at all times an EU owned and EU controlled airline, even if the UK exits the EU without a deal."

Anyone that is concerned should check before they travel.