£1 coins with minting errors are selling for £200 - here's how to spot them

Wednesday, 30th May 2018, 12:03 pm
Updated Wednesday, 30th May 2018, 13:12 pm

A batch of £1 coins with minting errors are currently in circulation and could be worth as much as £200 per coin.

The 12-sided coins featuring a golden border and silver centre have become commonplace since the original round gold coloured coins were replaced in October last year.

Today, however, a batch of the £1 coin's latest incarnation have been found to be completely gold in colour, devoid of a silver centre. The error appears to have occured when the new coin was stamped with an old £1 coin blank.

Up to £205

And now online collectors are looking to snap up the limited collection of coins.

According to coin collector website Change Checker, the flawed coins are going for up to £205 on Ebay.

Only a limited amount of coins appear to be in circulation with the first of the all-gold coins being spotted in January.

***Stop Press***New £1 Minting 'error' discovered!https://t.co/cweN59w4J6 pic.twitter.com/738PxmuDam

— Change Checker (@ChangeChecker) January 31, 2018

Another was taken to auction in February earlier this year, but it is unclear what price the coin fetched.

Given their unique appearance the coins are easy enough to spot - and if you are lucky enough to possess one of the coin fanatics Change Checker recommend sending suspected coins to The Royal Mint Museum who offer a free verification service. Typically the coins will be verified and sent back to you within a few days.

Once your coin has been confirmed as a genuine article you can either hold onto the coin for safekeeping or sell online and cash in.

Scarce coins

According to Change Checker there are a number of scarcely available coins which could be worth more than the price emblazoned on them.

Kew Gardens 50ps can fetch a pretty penny (Photo: Shutterstock)

50 pence coins featuring Kew Gardens are among the rarest coins available selling for up to £91 on Ebay.

£2 coins featuring from the 2002 Commonwealth Games can make up to £15.