Storm in a tea cup or offensive? Doncaster cafe owner lets customers decide

Klem Panagiotou, co-owner of The Tuck-In Cafe. Picture: Andrew Roe
Klem Panagiotou, co-owner of The Tuck-In Cafe. Picture: Andrew Roe

A cafe owner who found himself at the centre of sign scandal that made the national news says the experience has left a sour taste in his mouth.

Klem Panagiotou, co-owner of The Tuck-In Cafe in Doncaster town centre, was shocked to learn that the cafe sign – that had been up for more than 20 years – had made the headlines after customers mistook the letter T in it.

The sign at the Tuck-In Cafe, St Sepulchre Gate where customers are complaining that the T looks like an F. Picture: Andrew Roe

The sign at the Tuck-In Cafe, St Sepulchre Gate where customers are complaining that the T looks like an F. Picture: Andrew Roe

The businessman said the article had generated lots of feedback from customers at the St Sepulchre Gate cafe . . . the majority of whom saw the funny side.

But, after having a week to digest it, Klem is now keen for customers to have their say and says he is willing to change the sign if it is causing offence.

He said: “One of my regular customers phoned me to tell me the story was in the national news and I thought it was a joke at first. When I bought the paper, I couldn’t believe it.

“The same sign has been up for more than 20 years and no one has ever mentioned anything about it before so I thought it was a bit strange.

“A lot of customers were laughing their heads off about it and at first. We all had a good laugh but the more I read it, the more angry I was that the story has been twisted.

“Some of the quotes in the story were questioning if we’d done this on purpose to get a reaction.

“No one has ever mentioned it to us before or said it was offensive.

“We are having to explain ourselves to some of the older regulars who read the article and defend ourselves. We shouldn’t be having to do that.

“Business is tough enough as it is at the minute without people being put off.”

So Klem is now urging customers to get in touch with feedback to decide if the sign, that has been a permanent fixture for more than 20 years, will be changed.

He said: “I think most people saw the funny side but, if people are offended or upset by it, I would consider changing it.”