Recruitment boost for Doncaster hospital

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Health bosses believe Doncaster’s hospital is set for a recruitment boost - by becoming a teaching hospital on Friday.

Following a public consultation, Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust will officially become a Teaching Hospital on Friday.

Officials at the trust say attaining teaching hospital status will help improve education and training capacity, grow research capability and improve the recruitment and retention of high quality staff across all professions, which will have a positive impact on the quality of care given and outcomes for patients.

By 2018, the trust is projecting to train 25 per cent of the medical students in the region and is already training 30 per cent of all non-medical students.

Supported by both Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Sheffield, and with approval from regulator NHS Improvement, the Trust will now change its name to ‘Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust’.

Mike Pinkerton, chief executive at the Trust, said: “This is a fantastic achievement and I want to, in particular, share my thanks with our partners at both the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University, as well as our dedicated team at the Trust, whose hard work has enabled the organisation to take this next exciting step forward.

“Achieving this status will not only allow us to enhance our services, but is also a recognition of our achievements in providing high quality education and research and will be a huge benefit, both in our local communities and regionally.”

Throughout the past decade, the trust says it has been an integral partner to both Sheffield universities in the training provided to undergraduates and placement students at its Doncaster, Bassetlaw and Montagu sites.

Professor Deborah Murdoch-Eaton, Dean of Medical Education at the University of Sheffield, said: “Our students report positive experiences at Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals, and there is an active approach to developing effective recruitment, retention and learning strategies jointly with the University, and by 2018, 25 per cent of our students will undertake their core placements within the Trust, reflecting the high quality of educational experience.

“In both education and research, the Trust has shown a strong commitment to continuous improvement and we are entirely supportive of the Trust receiving Teaching Hospital status and this will only strengthen our partnership in the years to come.”

Professor Karen Bryan, Pro-Vice Chancellor for Regional Engagement and Dean of Sheffield Hallam University’s Faculty of Health and Wellbeing, said: “We have enjoyed a long-standing relationship with Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals.

This has enabled us to provide our healthcare students with invaluable practical experience to enhance their learning as well as the opportunity for our academics to conduct vital clinical research to improve outcomes for patients.

“On behalf of Sheffield Hallam University, I would like to congratulate the Trust on receiving its Teaching Hospital designation and we look forward to building on our very successful partnership.”

A consultation process was held in November to gather feedback on the proposed name change, with an overwhelmingly positive response.

Letters of support were received from Bassetlaw and Doncaster Clinical Commissioning Groups, Health Education England, Nottinghamshire and Doncaster Councils, Sheffield College, Academic Health Science Network, RNN Group, the MPs for Bassetlaw and Doncaster Central and local residents.

The Trust will be officially relaunching as Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust on Friday 27 January.