Please be upstanding for Hay Majesty the Queen!

Artist Andrew Farmer, of Oldcotes and teacher at Sir Thomas Wharton stands infront of his painted haybales at Stone Brigg Farm, with farm owner David Brookfield. Picture: Andrew Roe
Artist Andrew Farmer, of Oldcotes and teacher at Sir Thomas Wharton stands infront of his painted haybales at Stone Brigg Farm, with farm owner David Brookfield. Picture: Andrew Roe

SHE’S been commemorated on stamps, coins and canvass but one artist has found a new way to create a portrait of the Queen - hay.

These giant images of the Queen Elizabeth II were created by Andrew Farmer with just a ladder, a stack of hay bales and a can of spray paint.

Artist Andrew Farmer, of Oldcotes and teacher at Sir Thomas Wharton stands infront of his painted haybales at Stone Brigg Farm. Picture: Andrew Roe

Artist Andrew Farmer, of Oldcotes and teacher at Sir Thomas Wharton stands infront of his painted haybales at Stone Brigg Farm. Picture: Andrew Roe

The 15ft-high masterpiece is standing for all to see at Stoney Brigg Farm in Tickhill after farmer David Brookfield decided he wanted a piece of art fit for Diamond Jubilee.

Admitting that his drawing skills would not receive the Royal seal of approval, David enlisted the help of Sir Thomas Wharton Community College art teacher Andrew.

Andrew, 26, who teaches part-time at the school in Tait Avenue, Edlington, jumped at the chance to work on the large and unusual canvass.

He said: “It was a bit daunting at first. It’s also a busy time of year as there are GCSE art exams taking place but I decided it really was the chance of a lifetime. I began studying portraits of the queen until I knew the image really well.”

It took just three hours to complete the work with Andrew spraying the paint, then having to run back about 20 metres to check on the image and make sure it looked in proportion.

Once the first drawing was complete, David was so impressed that he asked Andrew to complete a second one.

Andrew, of Compton Avenue, Sprotbrough, added: “I must have walked miles during the process. I’m not great at heights either so it wasn’t the easiest piece of work I’ve ever done - but I think it’s probably the strangest and I’ve had a lot of positive feedback”

Growing up in Denaby Main, Andrew graduated from Kent’s Canterbury Christ Church University in fine art and won scholarships to a prestigious art course in London, as well as winning the Richard Ford Award in Spain.

Beef and arable farmer David, whose family have run Stoney Brigg Farm in Worksop Road for four generations, said: “I was absolutely gobsmacked by the results. I didn’t expect it to look as good as it does. I’ve had a lot of people ask about Andrew and admire what he’s done.”

The Queen’s Head artwork will remain in place until June 4.

For more examples of Andrew’s work, visit www.andrewfarmerfineart.co.uk

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