Little history fan Nicholas is top of the pots

Nicholas Dunn, eight, of Thorne, as found roman pottery and clay pipes on a field near his home. Picture: Andrew Roe
Nicholas Dunn, eight, of Thorne, as found roman pottery and clay pipes on a field near his home. Picture: Andrew Roe
0
Have your say

History certainly isn’t horrible for youngster Nicholas Dunn.

For the Thorne schoolboy has amassed a huge collection of broken pottery and historic artefacts from fields around his home - and now experts have confirmed that some of his finds date back to the Roman era.

Green Top Primary pupil Nicholas, aged eight, has been busily picking up the pieces near his home in Foundry View after taking up an interest in metal detecting and searching for buried treasure a few years ago,

And now his digging and persistence has paid off after curators at Doncaster Museum confirmed some of his discoveries are Roman pottery - dating from nearly 2,000 years ago.

Mum Michelle Holden said: “He has been collecting bits for a while now and he wanted the museum to look at them to find out more about them.

“I will be honest, I didn’t think there was much of note in there so I was really surprised when they told us that some of the pieces come from the Roman era.”

The area is known for its strong Roman connections with the town being built on a fort, a key post on the Great North Road between London and Edinburgh and its name Danum, giving rise to Doncaster.

His haul also includes clay pipes with carved head figures dating back 200 to 300 years, as well as all sorts of other bric-a-brac.

And while the haul is not valuable, the youngster is rightfully pleased with his efforts.

He said: “I am going to keep them all. I am really happy with what I’ve found.”

Museum officer Peter Robinson, said: “We were really pleased to meet Nicholas and see what he has found.

“It is a delight for me as an archaeologist that someone so young clearly has a passion for archaeology – a young Indiana Jones if you like.

“His findings include pieces of pottery from as far back as the Roman era – around the years 160 to 220 and include parts of what look like a mixing bowl and a small jar.

He had also found some 18th centuary pottery too.

He added: “We wish him well in his endeavours as a budding archaeologist - and in his search for future finds.”