Multi-million pound research scheme to benefit Doncaster patients

Dr Trevor Rogers, Director of Research & Development and a Consultant Respiratory Physician at Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Dr Trevor Rogers, Director of Research & Development and a Consultant Respiratory Physician at Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

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People in Doncaster are set to benefit from a £24m research programme aimed at improving care for people with long term illnesses.

Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is joining other NHS organisations, universities, local government, industry and charities in investing in the programme, which will look at new ways of caring for people with long-term conditions like diabetes, stroke, mental health issues and the lung disease COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

The £24m will fund an extensive range of research and pilots to provide earlier diagnosis and greater support for people with long term illnesses.

There will be a special focus on supporting frail older people in poor health, reducing the risk of them experiencing sudden exacerbations that need emergency hospital treatment.

Patients may also be able to trial ‘remote health’ support – technology that monitors key clinical information such as their heart rate and indicates whether any intervention is needed, helping them manage their condition better.

Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is investing £14m in the scheme as members of the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care, Yorkshire and Humber (CLAHRC YH). A further £10m is being provided through a grant from the National Institute for Health Research.

Dr Trevor Rogers, director of research & development and a consultant respiratory physician at Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, said: “We are excited about the opportunities and potential benefits of this programme for people in Doncaster,

“Long-term conditions like diabetes, stroke and COPD can have a major impact on both the length and the quality of a person’s life. There are some exciting new technologies, however, that may help people manage their condition better or provide early warning if it is deteriorating.

“The CLAHRC has a good track record of championing the development and adoption of new ways of treating long-term conditions. In Doncaster, for example, they have supported a local study into early diagnosis of lung cancer in patients with COPD.

“We are also introducing a new ‘care bundle’ for people with COPD, with CLAHRC support. It will ensure patients are offered a full suite of treatment and support, including ensuring education on use of inhaled and other treatments, giving up smoking and pulmonary rehabilitation with exercise and education sessions.”

Professor Sue Mawson, director of CLAHRC Yorkshire and Humber, said: “Yorkshire and Humber has some of the highest levels of social deprivation and health inequalities in the country, and the North-South divide is growing, so this is a significant investment which will enable us to address some of the huge health challenges we face across our region.

“This will put us in a strong position to become a world leader in health services research and healthcare innovation, transforming the health of thousands of people living in the region and beyond.”