Doncaster cyclist ‘lucky to be alive’ after crash with 70mph car on A1

66-year-old cyclist Graham Huck, of Grange Road, Woodlands, was seriously injured in a collision whilst taking part in a competition with Doncaster Wheelers Cycling Club.
66-year-old cyclist Graham Huck, of Grange Road, Woodlands, was seriously injured in a collision whilst taking part in a competition with Doncaster Wheelers Cycling Club.
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A former Doncaster cycling champion is ‘lucky to be alive’ after being flung into the air and thrown 60 metres down the road by a speeding car.

Graham Huck, aged 66, was competing with the Doncaster Wheelers Cycling Club when he was hit by a car that is thought to have been travelling 70 miles per hour.

Graham Huck pictured in 1975, after being crowned the best in Yorkshire, and ranked third in England. Picture: Liz Mockler D2923LM

Graham Huck pictured in 1975, after being crowned the best in Yorkshire, and ranked third in England. Picture: Liz Mockler D2923LM

The grandfather-of-six narrowly escaped death in the collision on the A1, during which he suffered serious injuries including a punctured lung, a broken pelvis, five broken ribs and a fractured collarbone.

Graham was knocked down by the car as he was cycling on the A1 and the driver tried to overtake him at ‘great speed.’

The former British time trial champion said he does not remember what happened due to the trauma of the accident, but says an eye witness told police that he somersaulted into the air and over the vehicle after being hit.

“The police measured it and said I was knocked 62 metres down the road,” said Graham, who this year celebrated 50 consecutive years of competing in cycling races.

Grandfather  and cyclist  Graham Huck, from Woodlands, was hit by a driver on the A1 in July leaving him with serious injuries including a punctured lung, broken pelvis, five broken ribs and a fractured collarbone.

Grandfather and cyclist Graham Huck, from Woodlands, was hit by a driver on the A1 in July leaving him with serious injuries including a punctured lung, broken pelvis, five broken ribs and a fractured collarbone.

Graham, of Grange Road, Woodlands added: “All I remember is being in the lay-by and there being a lot of blood. I think I was probably there for about an hour as the paramedics worked on me.

“When I was lying there on the road, immediately after the accident, I feared that I would never be able to go cycling again. It was very frightening,”

Following the collision, which took place just outside Long Bennington in Nottinghamshire on July 18, Graham was taken to Nottingham University Hospitals’ East Midlands Major Trauma Centre where he says medics saved his life.

He said: “It’s the best trauma unit in the country so I was incredibly lucky that it was so near.

“The level of care I received was fantastic and it wasn’t just that they treated me so quickly – it was the level of personal care.

“They took the time to listen – they were always there, ready to help – I cannot praise them enough.”

Graham was kept in hospital for two weeks and is now undergoing rehabilitation at home for his injuries; the long-lasting effects of which are not yet known.

But the plucky grandfather said the crash ‘isn’t going to get in his way’ and hopes to be back on his bike within three months.

He aspires to be competing again by the end of 2017.

“I live for cycling, I have been doing it as hobby since 1965 so it’s a massive part of my life and who I am,” he said.

“I can’t wait to go out again. I know I have a lot of recovering to do but I’m determined I will be back on the road soon.”

Graham said he wants to ‘move on’ from the incident and does not feel any anger towards the driver who hit him.

However, he said he hopes the driver involved and other motorists can learn from what happened to him and use it as a reason to give cyclists more ‘respect on the road.’

Nottingham Hospitals Charity’s ‘Saving Lives Helipad Appeal’ is raising £3m for an on-site helipad for the air ambulance, which currently has to land at playing fields at the University of Nottingham.

It is hoped the new helipad at the Queen’s Medical Centre will save precious minutes for patients like Graham.

Donate at www.savetimesavelives.org.uk