Stopping the rot in children’s teeth due to tooth decay across the UK

Tooth decay in children.
Tooth decay in children.
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Almost a third of five-year-olds now have tooth decay and some children are waiting up to a year to have their rotten teeth removed because there is such a back log.

That is according to statistics obtained by 32 Whites dental care.

Dr John Mantel, of 32 Whites dental care said: “One third of five-year-olds in the UK have tooth decay. This is a shocking statistic and as a country we could be taking much better care of our children’s teeth. Simple changes to a child’s diet is the most effective way to reduce tooth decay. Maybe warnings on sugary snacks and fizzy drinks is the next logical step in combatting the problem.”

He urged people to combat the risk that sugary drinks pose and added: “Simple changes to a child’s diet is the most effective way to reduce tooth decay. Maybe warnings on sugary snacks and fizzy drinks is the next logical step in combating the problem.”

Partner of Doncaster Dental centre, Jane Cremer, echoed the sentiments and added: “Sugary drinks cause decay, but my own personal bug bear are energy drinks that are extremely high in sugar and are an unmitigated disaster for the teeth of young adults in the area.”

She further added: “I personally look at frequency of consumption of sugary products. The more times per day one has sugar you will get. i would advise that drinks and snacks between meals should be sugar free. A really safe drink is water and it’s free.

“In the past year have personally sent two to three young adults for removal of all their teeth due to consumption of energy drinks. I have noticed that Doncaster has a high rate of tooth decay in children.”

According to statistics from the Royal College of Surgeons, Yorkshire and the Humber has the second highest level of tooth decay among children, with 33 percent having rotten teeth by the age of five, nearly 26,000 children, aged five to nine, were admitted to hospital in England in 2013-14, up 14 percent from 2011 with, 40 percent of children in England not seeing a dentist in one year.

A spokesman for Tesco, which has agreed to remove high sugary drinks from its shelves, said: “We want to help our customers make healthier choices and that’s why we have pledged to continue to cut sugar from the food and drink on our shelves. From September all the children’s juice drinks we sell will have no added sugar in them because we know it’ll make a positive difference to children’s health.”